Your say April 2018

RACV RoyalAuto magazine

Left, right and centre
Make it safe and we will walk
Taking the time
Happy chauffeur
Up in smoke
Smell the coffee
Naming rights
A game for all
Mighty Goulburn
Paying the price
A bridge too far
 

Left, right and centre

The idea of marking arrows on the road to prevent overseas visitors from driving on the wrong side of road could also be promoted on our footpaths. Educating locals and visitors to walk on the left side of the path would allow easier movement for pedestrians. Many people walk on the wrong side of the path, often with their head down, often causing a spread across both sides of the path that impedes other pedestrians. A combined campaign of keeping to the left on roads and footpaths would reinforce the message that in Australia the left side is the correct side to be on whether you are in a car, on a bike or on foot.

Lyn Golder, Hawthorn

Make it safe and we will walk

I applaud the articles ‘Why don’t our kids walk to school any more’ and ‘Active kids ease traffic squeeze’ (RA March), especially the comment “…safe places to cross busy roads will help families choose to walk”.

For more than a year we’ve been campaigning to improve safety for pedestrians and cyclists (especially school kids) at a large local roundabout in Kew (corner Belford Road and Asquith  Street) that is an accident waiting to happen.

Belinda Lui, Kew

Taking the time

Re kids walking to school (March RA), I applaud those parents teaching their children independence. That was our plan, but after buying our house the government closed many schools. The closest primary school was then three kilometres away (too far for a five-year-old to walk), so the kids were driven.

What we found worrying later, in senior secondary, was the “time poor” attitude of parents who still drove their kids – even when they had learner’s permits. We made our kids drive at that point, and allowed extra time so they could drive around the back streets before school – if only for 15 minutes.

Arnis Vejins, Blackburn South

Happy chauffeur

In the ’90s my two sons attended the same school in Glen Waverley from prep to year 12. They were driven and picked up by me every day. I used to say if I had a dollar for every time I passed through the school gate I’d be a millionaire.

The saddest day of my life was when my eldest got his licence and a car at the age of 18 – then he drove his younger brother to school and back home.

I’m not saying this is a good thing, but I look back on these days as a special time when we three listened to the radio, guessed the song, and spent time together without the interruption of TV or homework (no mobile phones then).

Joyce Parsons, Malvern East

Up in smoke

Re your article on the legalisation of burnout sessions (RA March), I believe there is a side to this activity that participants and spectators at either legal or illegal sessions fail to consider.

As professional fire officers, we do everything in our power, including the use of breathing apparatus and heavy-duty protective clothing, to prevent ourselves being exposed to smoke, in particular the highly toxic and poisonous smoke emanating from the burning of rubber and other hydrocarbon-based compounds.

I doubt anyone these days would willingly stand in a cloud of asbestos dust, but people freely stand in clouds of tyre smoke.

Paul Caligari, Juvenile Fire Awareness Practitioner, Dandenong Fire Brigade

Smell the coffee

I applaud the RACV Healesville Country Club donation to Worawa Aboriginal College (RA March).

What a thrill to see the two talented students in front of the commercial coffee machine. I cannot wait to visit the Sandra Bardas Art Gallery to check out the coffee.

Julie Wiltshire, Lower Templestowe

Naming rights

That was quite a nice article about Western Port (RA March), but we would be very glad if it could be called by its correct name.

It is Western Port (I know it is common practice to add bay) – named by George Bass – but let us keep some of our history and call it by its correct name.

The same applies to Port Phillip – just like Port Jackson or Port Botany.

Jan and Bob Reeves, Notting Hill

EDITOR'S NOTE: RoyalAuto uses the style Westernport Bay and Port Phillip Bay, as per the Macquarie Dictionary, which is our style reference, and common usage.

A game for all

Congratulations on the great article on croquet (RA March). Although not a sport that hits the headlines very often, croquet is a truly great game. It can be as competitive as liked or can be played purely for the social side, and by anyone at all. It requires the player to constantly be thinking ahead, as in pool or even chess.

I encourage readers to call in at a club near them, talk to the members and find out more about our wonderful game.

Barbara Snibson, Bacchus Marsh

Mighty Goulburn

Your article ‘Paddle Away’, about experiencing Victoria’s rivers, brought back many memories as over the years I have enjoyed running along the banks of the Lower Yarra, fishing in the Glenelg, swimming in the Murray, caravanning next to the Mitchell and kayaking in the Upper Murray.

However, I was disappointed that there was no mention of Victoria’s mightiest river, the Goulburn. From the crystal-clear water of its upper reaches to the lakes around Nagambie and the lower reaches through Murchison and Shepparton on its way to the Murray, the Goulburn provides unrivalled diversity.

Royden James, Murchison

Paying the price

As an Amarok driver like Mat Mason in the February issue of RA, I have nothing but contempt for the companies charging higher rates for twin-cab utes on CityLink and EastLink.

I would love to drive a Corolla like Mr Stephens (Letters, March RA) from Swan Hill, where there are no tolls, however I use my Amarok in my sales job all over Melbourne, as a 4WD and to tow my camper trailer. It would not make financial sense to own two vehicles.

Richard Tapps, Ferntree Gully

A bridge too far

We made a mistake in captioning the cover photograph of RA March. The bridge featured is not, as stated, Princes Bridge, but Queens Bridge sited further west on the Yarra, connecting William and Market Streets on the river’s north bank with Queens Bridge Street on the south.

The Heritage Council of Victoria states that Queens Bridge is notable for its very flat arch and its concrete-filled iron cylinder supports, as seen above. It was opened in 1890 to help link port, recreational and industrial facilities with the city.

CONTACT US

email: letters@royalauto.com.au
post: RoyalAuto Letters, Level 9, 485 Bourke Street, Melbourne VIC 3000. 

facebook.com/racv
twitter.com/theracv
instagram.com/theracv

Letters cannot be considered for publication unless they are under 150 words and have the writer’s full name and postal address. This applies whether submitted by email or post. Only the name and suburb will be published. Letters may be edited for clarity and length.