Your say October 2017

RACV RoyalAuto magazine

Suspension of this belief
Colourful stand on the road toll
Send spades
Rough surfaces
Train caravaners
Light up please
Totally happy
Robot car query
Glaring issue
Rule could kill
In the bag
How it was

Suspension of this belief

I live in Melbourne’s north east and have learned not to drive in the left lane where pit covers have been replaced. Why can’t the work people level the cover with the road surface? The same applies to potholes etc. If I were to do a business course it would be in the car suspension /front-end alignment game. Who wants to be a millionaire  ... I do. 

Leonard King, Bundoora

Colourful stand on the road toll

The importance of cycle safety was brought home to me recently when I almost drove across the path of a cyclist. It was bright sunshine, he was tall and slim, with clothing that blended with his background. I was horrified and shaken, and took several minutes to recover.

I am a scientist. My eyes are trained to differentiate shapes. Like many drivers, my driver’s eye has been trained to see vehicles and pedestrians. I don’t see black cars and black-clothed motorcyclists at night very well. I don’t see cyclists that blend with the background.

When driving, I quickly see cyclists, motorcyclists, roadside workers, etc. who wear hi-vis colours. How silly are dark-coloured cars? We have a bright-red car, and don’t wear dark clothes when out on a stroll. The cyclist saw our car and together we saved his life.

We motorists must re-train our eyes. Motorists don’t want to hit cyclists, motorcyclists or pedestrians. I believe cyclists, motorcyclists and pedestrians need to add hi-vis colours to their driving/walking repertoire. Together we can head towards zero road toll.

David Brown, Chirnside Park

Send spades

I’ve just driven the Melbourne/Echuca/Swan Hill/Mildura/Portland/Port Campbell/Melbourne circuit and cannot believe what a mess our country roads are in. Our major highways have many large potholes or patches of broken surface, simply identified with a yellow sign nearby warning “Rough Surface” or “Road Hazard”. It’s time to send some spades and machines out of the city.

Patricia Woolcock, Ivanhoe 

Rough surfaces

Further to “Hole lot of trouble,” (RA, August) I wish to add my concerns.  Having travelled on many rural highways and roads during the last three months, including the Murray Valley, Northern, Midland, Glenelg, Henty and Princes, I am very concerned. In many areas we see signs stating “Rough surface ahead” and some with a 40km/h speed limit. The conditions are the worst I have seen for a long time.

I am also concerned at the number of black vehicles on rural roads. These are hard to see. In my younger days the only person who wanted a black vehicle was the undertaker.

G.N. Hedditch, Echuca 

Train caravaners

Having just completed a round-the-country road trip (18,500 kilometres), it is my view that people towing caravans should have skills training leading to an endorsed licence to be able to tow a caravan. My observations of caravaners going too slow, speeding up, overloading, having difficulty backing and generally not concentrating on driving has led to this conclusion. This is not meant as a criticism, but a suggestion to improve the skills of people towing vans. Truck drivers cannot just get in a truck and go; I wonder how many people retire, buy a van and head off on their adventure. 

Wilfred Reuther, Kyabram

Light up please

I’m always on the road an hour or so before dawn and am amazed at the number of vehicles travelling in the pre-dawn darkness with malfunctioning or missing head/tail lights. The main offenders appear to be newspaper delivery vehicles and tradies’ or construction vehicles.

Presumably these drivers rely on a low police presence on the road to escape detection, but are a menace to other road users.

Peter Dwyer, Box Hill 

Totally happy

We have been RACV members for more than 50 years, having had Total Care for about 15 years with few calls for help.

Recently, we drove to Queensland and the day after arrival, I tripped and fell, fracturing the top of my arm. The long drive home was forbidden by doctors, so a call to RACV for help was answered, with Aussie Assist arranging to get our car home. Phone calls kept us informed every step of the way. 

We flew home, and within 10 days of our arrival back in Melbourne, we not only had our car delivered here, but had been reimbursed for our air-fare and for a taxi to the airport. Our sincere and grateful thanks for the wonderful service provided when we most needed it.

Wendy and Perce Boyle, Boronia

Robot car query

The driverless technologies have me wondering if there is any need to be licensed to drive. If the car can be set up to take you to work, why not have it take the children to kindergarten or sports events and then return home. What about the loss of the designated driver? Can you be intoxicated or substance affected if you are a passenger? What about insurance? I presume the software company would be responsible as it is the ‘driver’. I foresee a massive amount of bureaucratic legislation regarding accountability and responsibility.

Bill Politis, Greensborough

Glaring issue

I am concerned about the glare of modern headlights when they approach you, the glare is so bad that even when dipped they can cause momentary blindness. Are there standards that headlights must adhere too or have modern headlights slipped through?

Graeme Sargeant, Strathfieldsaye

Rule could kill

While the new road rule requiring drivers to slow to 40km/h may be for the safety of emergency workers, and may work fine in 60km/h zones, what happens if I’m in the outside lane travelling at 100km/h with a B-double semi behind me and a police car pulls someone over in the inside emergency lane and I have to slow to 40km/h? Who cares about my safety when said B-double ploughs into me as it cannot slow as quick as me?

Garry Mace, Amherst 

In the bag

Recently on a cruise ship, we were required to put out our suitcases for transfer the night before exiting. Packing a small collapsible backpack made it possible to carry hands-free, all those essential last-minute items such as night attire and toiletries. Equally useful for coach tours.

Margaret Topp, Strathdale

How it was

I travelled the Eyre Highway c1960 before the Perth Commonwealth Games and enjoyed the extended road assistance offered to drivers on the long journey during Games times. Right is a picture from the trip.

George Coop, Box Hill
 

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