Your say March 2017

RACV RoyalAuto magazine

Measure up
Make theft-proof screws standard
Change reporting
No accident
What’s the limit?
A call on safety
From bad to good
A tram example
Need more spaces
Stop means ...

Measure up

Looking through the comparison tables for the Kia Cerato and Mazda3 (RA, February 17), I note that most statistics are quoted in metric terms, however, the figures for the touch screen and wheels are still quoted in inches. Why, after half a century of using the metric system, are we still stuck with this anachronism?

Mike Gretton, Trentham

Make theft-proof screws standard

With the prevalence of stolen number plates being on cars used during robberies (Car Theft Driven Up, RA, February 2017), I wonder why theft-proof screws are not used when number plates are first applied to new vehicles and at any subsequent change of plates? Seems simple to me!

Betty Cardwell, Chirnside Park

Change reporting

News reports on road statistics should include those left totally and permanently disabled, not just those who have died (racv.com.au/impact). Polls have shown that most people would prefer the awful alternative than to be left totally and permanently disabled, left in a wheelchair, or unable to work due to neurological damage.

Maree Wragg, Croydon South

No accident

Wayne Llewellyn’s (Your Say, November 2016) thoughts about road traffic crashes (racv.com.au/impact) are spot on. I know of professional and regular drivers who have decades of “crash free” driving. Why? Mainly because they always drive defensively and watch way ahead of themselves. A senior traffic policeman once said to me. “Son, there is hardly ever a traffic accident. By definition a true accident is usually unavoidable. A crash is usually very avoidable!” Hear, hear.

Rob Purton, Bayswater

What’s the limit?

How often have we driven on roads looking for a speed notification sign? Wouldn’t it be an advantage to have the centre line/lines on the road colour coded to the legal limit in fluorescent paint, or coloured catseyes for night driving?

Frank Graham, Mill Park

A call on safety

I refer to the letter “Take their phone” (Your Say, February) and recall hearing a senior Victoria Police officer a couple of years ago being interviewed on radio about this. He said he believed the first fine should be raised to $1000 and subsequent offences should see the fine at least double along with loss of the phone.

I recently retired from a mostly mobile job and during the last 10 years the blatant use of hand-held phones has, in my opinion, increased and the current “hefty fines” are laughed at. Worst offenders were often professional people – cabbies, couriers, truckies etc. Most, if not all new vehicles built today have Bluetooth as standard, yet drivers of obviously newer vehicles seem to refuse to use it and choose to use their phones illegally.

I totally agree with the idea of taking their phones.

Eoin Macdonald, Narre Warren South

From bad to good

It was a blessing in disguise when, with my licence barely four months old, I was picked up for speeding while overtaking a vehicle in Korumburra in 1974.

I was given the choice – lose my licence or return to Korumburra to view a film consisting entirely of footage taken of road accident fatalities, and a brief explanation of the events leading up to the accidents. Like Ron (“Screen Saver,” Your Say, February), these films changed my driving habits irrevocably for the better, and, over 40 years on, the images and messages are still with me.

Judith Wakeman, Templestowe

A tram example

We just had a six-week stay in Stuttgart, Germany,  which has lots of trams now converted to light rail, as light rail carries more passengers. In the ’80s Stuttgart put its trams at busy intersections underground. It then connected these underpasses underground where road-rail separation was not possible. There are still plenty of above-ground trams but only where separation was possible. They also use short sections of single track where it was the cheaper option to separate road and rail. Every stop has a light indicating when the tram has to depart its stop. It works very well. Stuttgart has about 750,000 inhabitants and trams run every eight minutes. There is hope yet that someone wakes up.

Rolf Eberhardt, Strathbogie

Need more spaces

I would like to know what criteria is used to decide how many disabled spaces are allocated to any car park design. My husband is disabled and we find it hard to find a disabled space, particularly in Cranbourne shopping centre.

The underground car park has only five spaces for the disabled but well over 300 others. It makes life very hard as I need to be able to open the the passenger-side door to load my shopping as the electric scooter takes up all the boot space.

I also risk injury while assembling the scooter at the rear of the car.

Jacqueline Boundy, Cannons Creek

Stop means ...

The meaning of STOP seems to have changed. I rarely see people stop at stop signs, I would love to see some advertising reminding drivers what STOP actually means. So many drivers simply make a token effort to slow down.

Janet Pountney, Hampton

Contact us email letters@royalauto.com.au

Letters cannot be considered for publication unless they are under 150 words and have the writer’s full name and postal address. This applies whether submitted by email or post. Only the name and suburb will be published. Letters may be edited for clarity and length.