Intersections and roundabouts

Find out how to drive safely through large and small roundabouts and intersections.

Intersections can be tricky, with many vehicles, riders and pedestrians all travelling in different directions. We’ve summarised the top rules you should know so you can approach and cross an intersection or roundabout safely.

Tips on traffic lights

Red light arrow drop-out

Ever approach an intersection where the red-turn arrow switches off and no green-turn arrow is displayed? Don’t worry – it’s not a glitch!

In this scenario, the red arrow indicates that it’s not safe to turn just yet. When it drops out, it’s letting you know that you might be able to start turning, but you need to watch the remaining traffic lights and be mindful of oncoming traffic before you go. If the remaining light is green, you may start to turn right, just as you would at an intersection without arrow lights.

At some intersections once the arrow drops out there are no other traffic lights. In this case, you can start to turn after giving way to other road users.

Traffic lights at freeway entry ramps

Some freeway entry ramps are controlled by lights to make merging safer and easier by spacing out vehicles, known as ramp metering. Some operate 24/7, while others only switch on during peak-traffic times. Here’s how they work:

  • When the lights start to operate, the yellow light flashes for around one minute.
  • The lights then turn red for drivers on the entry ramp to stop at the stop line.
  • The lights then begin their green, yellow and red cycle.
  • The red traffic light means drivers must stop and not proceed until the light turns to green, just like standard red traffic lights at intersections.
  • Only one vehicle can enter the freeway from each lane, unless signs state otherwise.
  • Some freeway ramp signals allow trucks or vehicles with two or more people (T2/T3) to bypass the lights for priority access onto the freeway.

What to do when traffic lights aren’t working

First things first – don’t panic! When the lights are out, flashing yellow or just not working properly, simply approach the intersection with caution and courtesy, giving way to any vehicles approaching from the right. If you’re turning right, remember to give way to both oncoming traffic and traffic on your right.

When it’s safe to, you might also want to report the problem. You can do this by:

  • locating the pale green or grey box at the side of the intersection and noting the intersection identification number
  • calling VicRoads on 13 11 70 and quoting the identification number.

Do you stop or slow down at yellow lights?

A yellow light is not a signal to travel faster through the intersection to beat the red light. You must not travel through a yellow traffic light if you are able to stop safely before the stop line. If you can’t safely stop before the stop line, you must stop before entering the intersection itself.

If you’ve already entered the intersection when the light turns yellow or red, you must exit the intersection as soon as you can safely do so.

Keep in mind, just because you’ve crossed the stop line, does not necessarily mean you have entered the intersection. At this point, our recommendation would be that you stop.

What to do at roundabouts

Roundabouts can be big, small or multi-lane, but all of them require a cautious approach. The most important thing to remember is when you’re entering a roundabout, you must give way to any vehicle already in the roundabout and any tram that is entering or approaching the roundabout.

In many cases, this will mean giving way to vehicles already in the roundabout on your right. However in some cases, such as smaller roundabouts, vehicles that have entered to the left or the opposite side of the roundabout may mean you can’t safely enter, so you have to give way. At a small roundabout where a vehicle is turning, it may only be possible to have one vehicle in the roundabout at a time.

  • On multi-lane roundabouts, cyclists and animal riders in the far left-lane of the roundabout need to give way to any vehicle leaving the roundabout.
  • Drivers aren’t required to give way to pedestrians when leaving a roundabout, unless there’s a pedestrian crossing or zebra crossing.

Indicating at a roundabout

We often receive feedback that the rules for exiting a roundabout in NSW, QLD and SA are different to Victoria. While some Victorian road rules are different, when exiting a roundabout, they’re similar – indicating is required.

Here are the key things to remember:

  • Before entering, indicate as you normally would – left to turn left, right to turn right, no indicator if you’re going straight.
  • When you exit the roundabout, indicate left if practicable.

If you’re leaving the roundabout more than halfway around, indicate right. Halfway around is defined as leaving on a road that is substantially straight head from the road you entered on.

Is overtaking allowed in a roundabout?

It’s allowed, but only when line marking permits it and it’s safe to do so. Remember to indicate as you normally would and allow enough distance to avoid collision or obstruction to other vehicles.

A driving lesson on roundabouts

The summaries RACV provide on Victorian road rules are based on the Victorian Road Safety Road Rules 2017. We make sure to reference the exact rule where possible. When reading, keep in mind that we’re providing general information, not legal advice. If you’re looking for specific questions on any legal matter, consult with a lawyer for help.