A florist’s guide to this year’s most popular blooms

Living Well | Sarah Marinos | Posted on 28 January 2020

These are the the top flowers and floral trends set to bloom in 2020.

Just as with fashion, home design and music, our tastes for fresh flowers change from time to time, too. In 2018, the floristry industry in Australia earned $1.6 billion and a significant proportion of those earnings came from people buying flowers to brighten up their homes.

In recent times gladioli were in demand but were then replaced by carnations and cheerful gerberas.  Flamboyant Oriental lilies have also long been popular and bring a rich perfume into the home. 

So which blooms are taking their turn in the spotlight this year?

Wreath of native flowers fixed to timber frame


Blooming beauty: Six of this year's prettiest flowers and floral trends

Garden roses

“Roses are the number one cut flower in the world and I don’t see that changing,” says Michael van der Zwet, founder of Maxiflora and chairman of Flowers Victoria – the state’s peak body for commercial flower growers. But look for garden roses that have a fuller bloom and perfume. Perfumed roses are also more likely to be locally grown. “People are choosing fuller, frillier roses in burgundy, browns and coffee colours,” says Michael. 

Lisianthus

The delicate ruffled petals of the lisianthus, similar to a rose or peony, have always been a popular choice. But instead of the familiar pinks, whites and purples, current popular colours are champagnes, browns and autumnal tones. Look out for Rosanne Brown or Wonderous that still have the frills and full flower but in on-trend tones.

Grasses and leaves

Sustainability has found its way into the floral world with conscientious consumers choosing interesting grasses and leaves to make a standalone arrangement. “We’ve returned to Mother Nature with colours that are muted and tonal and that don’t have as much vibrancy,” says Liz Ricci, Manager of Flower Temple in Melbourne. “We’re seeing lots of shades of green so tropical foliage with lots of variegation and leaves like calathea, pampas grasses and dried palm leaves.” Arrange four or five leaves in a vase and add grasses. (More: Best plants for air purification)

Person holding pink garden rose

Photo @LifeOfJinkee.


Monstera leaf on pink backdrop

Photo @MyDeerLittlePony.


Hydrangeas on a vase

Photo: @FrankieTheLilSausage.


Tonal palettes

Mixing tones is more important than the choice of flowers, says Liz. So, collect flowers in different shades of pink or variations of beiges and earthy colours like browns and terracottas. “Look for pinks in clay tones rather than bright pinks, or choose cotton colours with beiges, browns and on-trend terracotta,” Liz suggests. 

Australian natives

Australian natives are always a favourite but they are enjoying a resurgence right now, says Michael. Pastel colours or bright reds and burgundies are most in demand. Kangaroo paws come in orange, such as Bush Ranger, while Pink Joey is salmon pink. Billy buttons in yellow-gold, proteas and bright-red and pink waratahs are also popular at the moment.  

Hydrangeas

They have been a staple in Australian gardens and vases because of their massive, colourful blooms. And, like the faithful roses, hydrangeas are also enjoying renewed popularity with people choosing the traditional whites, blues and pinks to add a splash to living rooms, entrance areas and dining tables. 


 
RACV Member Exclusive

Looking for a little extra flower power? RACV Members save 10 per cent on admission to the Melbourne International Flower & Garden Show, which will be held at the Royal Exhibition Building and Carlton Gardens from 25 to 29 March.