COVID-19: Victoria’s latest coronavirus rules, explained

Living Well | RACV | Images: Getty, Unsplash | Posted on 27 February 2021

Victorian restrictions ease further – here’s what you need to know about the latest COVID-19 rules.

Mask rules have been relaxed and more people will be allowed to gather in homes and outdoors as Victoria’s snap-lockdown restrictions continue to ease.


As of 11.59pm on 26 February up to 30 people from any number of households are allowed to visit private homes, and up to 100 can attend public gatherings outdoors.

Masks must be worn only in aged-care homes, hospitals, some retail settings, public transport and commercial passenger vehicles, but must be carried at all times.

Up to 75 per cent of employees can return to workplaces from 1 March, and restrictions on visits to aged-care homes and hospitals have been relaxed.

Restrictions have also been eased for indoor and outdoor entertainment venues, with crowds of up to 50 per cent allowed at AFL games at the MCG and Marvel Stadium when the season begins.

Read on for more details of Victoria’s restrictions and frequently asked questions below.

Melbourne train at station platform with masked travellers inside.

Trains are one of the few places where masks must still be worn in Victoria.


Victoria’s circuit-breaker lockdown eases


New rules apply from 11.59pm on 26 February 

  • Masks are mandatory only in aged-care homes, hospitals, public transport and commercial passenger vehicles, and retail settings like supermarkets and shopping centres. 
  • Up to 30 people from any number of households can visit a private home (up from five).
  • Up to 100 people can attend a public gathering outdoors (up from 20).
  • From 1 March up to 75 per cent of employees can return to the workplace.
  • There are no longer limits on visits to aged-care homes and hospitals, but masks must be worn.
  • Accommodation can be booked for groups of up to 30.
  • Seated venues (indoor and outdoor) are restricted to 75 per cent capacity (up from 50 per cent), with a maximum of 1000 people (up from 300). Indoor non-seated venues restricted to 50 per cent capacity with a maximum of 1000 (up from 300).

People wearing masks at Flinders St station
Family of four walking through park with toddler on bike

Restrictions have eased further after Victoria’s five-day circuit-breaker lockdown ended. 


COVID-19: Frequently asked questions


When do I need to wear a face mask

Masks no longer need to be worn outdoors, and indoors must be worn only in aged-care homes, hospitals, on public transport, in commercial vehicles and in retail settings of 2000 square metres or more, including shopping centres, shops inside shopping centres, department stores and supermarkets. Masks no longer need to be worn in schools. Acceptable coverings include surgical masks and cloth masks that cover the mouth and nose. 

Check out our ultimate guide to face masks for everything you need to know about how to wear and remove masks properly, as well as how to make your own.

Can I travel within Victoria?

Victorians are free to travel throughout the state.

How many guests can I have at home and at public gatherings?

Up to 30 guests from any number of households are permitted to visit private homes, and up to 100 people can attend public gatherings outdoors.

What are the rules for eating (and drinking) out?

Hospitality venues can open fully, subject to density limits of one person per two square metres.

What retail shops are allowed to open?

All retail shops can open, with density limits of one person per two square metres.

Can I visit my hairdresser or massage therapist?

Hairdressing, beauty and personal care services are allowed to open, and masks can be removed if required for treatments.

Can I return to my usual exercise routine?

Time limits on exercise have been removed. All indoor and outdoor sport and recreation can resume, and gyms, pools and indoor sports centres can reopen.

Can I play golf?

Yes. All outdoor recreation and sport is allowed to resume.

How many people can attend weddings, funerals and religious services?

Weddings, funerals and religious gatherings can go ahead with any number of attendees, subject to venue density limits. Weddings or funerals held in private residences are allowed only 30 guests.

How many people can attend venues like galleries and stadiums?

Indoor and outdoor seated venues are restricted to 75 per cent capacity (up from 50 per cent), with a maximum of 1000 people (up from 300). Indoor non-seated venues remain restricted to 50 per cent capacity, with a maximum of 1000 people (up from 300). 

Can I take my child(ren) to the playground?

All outdoor playgrounds are open, as are indoor play centres, skate parks and trampolining centres.

Are libraries and other community facilities allowed to open?

All community facilities including libraries, toy libraries and neighbourhood houses are allowed to open, with density limits.  

What are the new rules for visiting hospitals or care facilities?

There are no longer restrictions on visits to hospitals and care facilities, but masks must be worn.

Are schools and childcare open?

Schools have returned to onsite learning. Childcare and kinder remain open.

What about auctions?

Property inspections and live auctions can resume, with density limits. (More: How to buy and sell property in a pandemic.) 

I only have mild symptoms. Should I get a test?

Yes. Get tested immediately if you experience even mild symptoms, such as a sore throat, runny nose, cough or fever, or if you have visited a location that has been identified as a COVID-19 risk area. After the test, you must stay at home until you receive a negative result. Even if you are asymptomatic, you must stay home until you receive a text message confirming you do not have COVID-19.

Advice for all Victorians


No matter where you live in Victoria, everyone has an important role to play in suppressing the spread of COVID-19. You can help keep yourself and others safe by:

  • Maintaining 1.5 metres’ distance between yourself and people outside your immediate household.
  • Wearing a mask in required indoor settings.
  • Washing or sanitising your hands thoroughly and often especially after using the bathroom, before eating and after coughing or sneezing.
  • Avoiding coughing or sneezing into your hands. Use the crook of your elbow or tissue, and dispose of the tissue as soon as possible before washing your hands.
  • Getting a COVID-19 test immediately if you experience even mild symptoms, such as a sore throat, runny nose, cough or fever, then staying at home until receiving a negative result.